Sacroiliac Joint

Sacroiliac Joint

Always wondered but never asked?

The Sacroiliac Joint is the joint between the sacrum and the ilium bones of the pelvis, the sacrum has a very important role in that it actually supports the spine and enables us to walk.

The sacroiliac joint can be the cause of lower back pain and can often be missed or interpreted as a disc herniation. This is when the intervertebral disc protrudes and touches a nerve, resulting in pain. Obviously, this is an actual injury and does cause issues. The Sacroiliac joint though, known as the SI joint is no stranger to causing pain in the lower back. As we are watching clients gait, we are noticing pelvic imbalance more and more. A very common visual issue when people are walking, is the posterior pelvic region is locked, by locked I mean it’s hitched up and the opposite side is doing all the work. In this instance, it can be plain to see why pain is present. Currently, we are treating a lot of SI joint dysfunction due to all sorts of different activities. The techniques that we are using are listed below and enabling good positive results.

Techniques

  1. Posterior: Soft tissue work through the lower back into the glutes and piriformis area.
  2. Anterior: Rectus femoris attachments on the front of the pelvis. When this area is tight it can cause tilting of the pelvis. We spend lots of time in this area ensuring tightness is reduced.
  3. Anterior: Gapping the hip joint and monitoring the range of movement left to right and listening to our client’s feedback on how it feels.
  4. Anterior: throughout the session keep checking leg length and pelvic position. On many occasions, we find the Client has either a leg length discrepancy or pelvic tilt, rotation coupled with torsion.
  5. Comprehensive stretching of the area daily.

Symptoms

  1. Lower back pain usually below L5.
  2. Potentially numbness and weakness in the lower extremities.
  3. Hip and groin pain.
  4. Disturbed sleeping patterns.
  5. Trouble tying shoe laces.
  6. Pain when getting up from a low sitting position.
  7. Feeling unbalanced left to right.

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